toddlers and painting

A toddler finds it easier to paint on an easel rather than a flat surface.

If you can’t afford to buy an easel, make one by cutting out one side of a cardboard box and tape the other three sides together. Set it on the tabletop and set your toddler free.

From: suite101.com.

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motor control tip

Teach your baby to play with a xylophone or drum-like toy, which helps enable control of his hand, and gauge the strength needed to produce the desired varying sounds.

From: tinylove.com.

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toddler sized supplies

Cut down the frustration level of your toddler by seeking out toddler-sized supplies, such as thicker markers, crayons, paintbrushes and pencils. They will be easier to hold and use than the skinny ones meant for older children.

From: suite101.com.

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When toddlers won’t let go of stuff

If your baby finds it difficult to release an object voluntarily, place your hand directly under his to help him.

You can also help practice this skill by offering another object to divert his attention from the one in his hand.

From: tinylove.com.

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Understand what a time-out is – and isn’t

A time-out isn’t a punishment. It’s an opportunity for your child to learn how to cope with frustration and modify his behavior.

While your child is in a time-out, he’s on his own, so try to let him sit in solitude for a few moments. Any attention from you, positive or negative, will serve as reinforcement for his behavior.

From: babycenter.com.

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Book Suggestion

Ritalin-Free Kids: Safe and Effective Homeopathic Medicine for ADHD and Other Behavioral and Learning Problems is a book targeted to alternative methods of ADHD treatment.
From: Lil’ Fingers Storybooks and Games

Stopping the thumb sucking

By age three, some toddlers stop sucking on their own, but others need encouragement from Mom and Dad. more info

Iron Rich meals and vitamin C

When serving iron-rich meals, include foods that contain vitamin C (tomatoes, broccoli, oranges, and strawberries), which improve the body’s iron absorption.

From: kidshealth.org

1000-calorie diet for toddlers

Your toddler needs about 1,000 calories a day to meet his needs for growth, energy, and good nutrition.

If you’ve ever been on a 1,000-calorie diet, you know it’s not a lot of food. But your child will do just fine with it, divided among three small meals and two snacks a day.

From: American Academy of Pediatrics

Building dexterity and strength in toddlers

Mastering how to use their hands is one of the most important things your baby or toddler will be learning in the next few years of their life. But while they are learning how to hold and manipulate objects other very important brain functions, like language, are also developing.

You can help your child build strength and dexterity in their hands by playing some fun and easy games with them and doing some simple exercises.

From: brighttomato.com.au

Tired toddler tip

Wearing your 2 to 3 year old in a soft cloth carrier, backpack or sling can still be a huge lifesaver.

When your toddler is tired, over stimulated or otherwise out of sorts, wearing them will help them to settle down and maybe even go to sleep!

 From: theattachedparent.com

Fan safety

Never run fans on the floor with an infant or toddler around, their fingers are small and can enter the grill area of the fan.
From: ParentingToddlers.com

Independence and toddler development

Showing independence is part of normal toddler development and this often includes refusing to eat foods to see what will happen.
From: Better Health Channel

Book Suggestion

Bob Books, Set 1 A Beginning Readers book set.
From: Lil’ Fingers Storybooks and Games

Instill reading in kids

Begin visiting the library regularly by the time your child is two and she may well prefer reading to any other activity.
From: YourParentingsSolutions.com

Reading tip

Move your finger under the words as you read aloud. This helps preschoolers connect printed words to spoken words.From: RIF.org

Exploring writing

Allow older toddlers to begin exploring writing instruments (pens, markers and crayons).

Provide them with other toys and activities (e.g., pouring water) that develop the hand-eye coordination and fine motor skill necessary for writing.

From: Zero to three.org

How to test for fever without a thermometer

When testing for fever without a thermometer, use the lip test. Touch your lips to the forehead of the baby.

From: huggies.com

How to model emotional intelligence

Model emotional intelligence. Your kids are watching very closely. They see how you respond to frustration, they see how resilient you are, and they see whether you’re aware of your own feelings, and the feelings of others.

From: academyforcoachingparents.com

Explore foods

Let your child explore food by touching, and expect some mess.
From: Better Health Channel