Car seat fact

Did you know 98% of car seats are installed incorrectly?

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Balloons at chld parties

Avoid having balloons at parties for kids under 3, because balloons can be a choking hazard.

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Watch out for small objects

Anything that’s small or sharp is dangerous, as kids love exploring with their mouths. Make sure that small and sharp objects are out of reach, so clear tables and counter tops.

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Food hazards for toddlers

Toddler’s have one-third the jaw strength of an adult. Softer meats are good alternatives, such as fish, hamburger and high quality lunchmeats.

Hard to chew red meats and other foods also pose choking hazards for toddlers. Never serve anything larger than a dime and be sure to cut your toddler’s food into small, manageable pieces and never leave your child unattended while he’s eating.

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Protecting against falls for toddlers

Although parents often baby-proof stairs and other areas where babies and toddlers could potentially fall, they may not think about falling as a risk for older children.

According to the Home Safety Council, falls are the leading cause of nonfatal home injuries among children under age 15, accounting for an average of 1.3 million injuries a year.

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Christmas tree safety tip

Use LED lights that burn cool so your child does not get burnt if they should grab a Christmas light inadvertently.

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Covering electrical outlets

Toddlers are extremely able to manipulate things around the home like electrical sockets and appliances.

Since they mimic our behavior, they will no doubt try to stick things in every hole they can find. Start by covering electrical outlets and vents throughout the house and make sure that no appliances are left plugged in.

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Hanukkah safety tips

Place the Hanukkah menorah out of the reach of small children and curious pets.

The flames from lighted candles and oils can not only burn tots and pets, but can create a fire hazard threatening the safety of other members in the household. If you place a lighted menorah near a window, pull back draperies and remove other flammable objects.

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Trick-or-treat safety tip

When going out trick-or-treating, fasten reflective tape to costumes and bags to help drivers see you.

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Teaching street safety

When walking, talk to your child about street safety. Show him/her how to stop at the edge of the street and look for cars.

Don’t expect your young child to do this by herself/himself. Start children wearing helmets with their first tricycles or play vehicles. When children begin helmet use early, they are more likely to keep the habit in later years.

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Swimming safety

Swimming is a favorite summertime activity. It’s also as major summer health risk for toddlers.

Even if your toddler has taken a swimming course, they should be supervised at all times when in or near water.

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Fireworks and tot safety

Do not allow young children to play with fireworks under any circumstances, even with adult supervision. Sparklers, considered by many the ideal "safe" firework for the young, burn at very high temperatures and can easily ignite clothing.

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Safety around BBQs

Children are naturally curious about barbecues.

They want to see what’s going on, how well lit it is, what’s cooking and are always keen to know when it’s going to be ready to eat. They’re drawn to where the cooking is going on, yet that’s the most dangerous place to be.

In fact, each year about 1,000 people suffer injuries, such as burns, caused by barbecues.

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Poison control

Know to call 1-800-222-1222 if someone takes poison. This number will connect you to emergency help in your area. Keep the number by every phone.

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Preparing for playdates

Having a clean and child proofed home is important, especially when hosting a first ever play date. For first play dates, parents often want to attend or at least view your home. You want them to get a good impression and know that their child will be safe in your care.

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Choking safety tip

Children can choke on small things. If something is small enough to fit in a toilet paper tube, it is not safe for little children.

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Fixing dangers around the house

As young children get older, they start to crawl and walk around the home. This is how they learn and grow, but it also can put them in danger.

To keep your child safe, parents need to find and fix the dangerous places. The Home Safety Council recommends that parents look at each room from their child’s eye level and use the following tips to make homes safer for young children.

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Toddler safe car seats

Keeping toddlers safe in the car means always placing them in a properly installed child car seat.

Use a five-point harness as long as possible. Moving a toddler to a booster seat that only utilizes the car’s seat belts greatly reduces his safety. Many full-sized booster seats include a five-point harness that goes up to 65 lbs. or more.

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Child gate safety tip

When safety proofing your house for toddlers, use a straight-slatted, screw-mounted gate at the top and the bottom of a stairway. Never use pressure gates at the top of the stairs.

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Tots and stairways

Keep your wobbly walking tot from stairways by installing sturdy safety gates at the top of the stairs and at the bottom. (Consider putting the lower gate three steps from the bottom, so your child has a small area to practice stair-climbing skills.)

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