Pool safety tip

Remove all toys from the pool after use so children aren’t tempted to reach for them.

From: ParentingToddlers.com

Eating hazard

Young children should always be supervised when eating.
From: Better Health Channel

Choking hazard list

The choking hazard list is based on the texture of the food, NOT the size of the food. Avoid these foods until they are at least 4 years of age: hot dogs, nuts and seeds, chunks of cheese or meat, whole grapes, hard gooey or sticky candy, popcorn, chunks of peanut butter, raw vegetables, raisins and chewing gum.
From: A Child grows in brooklyn.com

Choking hazzard

Reduce the risk of choking by avoiding small hard foods such as nuts, raw carrot, hard lollies and popcorn. Offer lightly steamed vegetable sticks instead.

From: betterhealth.vic.gov.au Opens in new window

Teething choking hazards

When teething, do not give your child frozen bagels, hard vegetables, like carrots or frozen food item. These things are choking hazards and could be very dangerous if a piece breaks off.

From: quickanddirtytips.com Opens in new window

Determining choking hazards

Children can choke on small things. If something is small enough to fit in a toilet paper tube, it is not safe for little children.

From: homesafetycouncil.org Opens in new window

Magnet danger

Watch carefully for loose magnets. If more than one is swallowed, they can attract each other in the body and cause serious injury or even death.

From: homesafetycouncil.org Opens in new window

Asthma and air quality

If your toddler has asthma, then you may already be familiar with air quality alerts. Poor quality air is fertile ground for asthma attacks, a serious summer health risk for toddlers with asthma.

Check your local news or online each morning to determine the status of air where you live and make plans accordingly.

From: associatedcontent.com Opens in new window

Poison control

Know to call 1-800-222-1222 if someone takes poison. This number will connect you to emergency help in your area. Keep the number by every phone.

From: homesafetycouncil.org Opens in new window

Sunscreen sensitivity

Try a lotion or creamy product with an SPF between 15 and 30, and test a small area on your child’s arm first to see if she’s sensitive to a particular sunscreen.

From: pgeverydaysolutions.com Opens in new window

When the sun is most intense

Avoid sun exposure from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. This is when the sun’s rays are most intense. Keep in mind that even on cloudy days, the sun can be just as strong; you’ll want to use these same precautions on those days as well.

From: pgeverydaysolutions.com Opens in new window

Babyproofing the backyard

The backyard should be considered another ‘room’ and should be childproofed just as an indoor room would be.

From: toddlerstoday.com Opens in new window

Safety for outdoor railings

If you have a deck, make sure the space between the railings is less than 4 inches. If it’s not, put up some kind of netting or protective shield. One Step Ahead sells a fantastic clear plastic protector that I’ve used for years.

From: whattoexpect.com Opens in new window

Toddler proofing the outdoors

If the outdoor area is adjacent to your house, then arrange proper fencing to prevent your toddler from going out of your area to the front road.

Attach a gate with the fencing and keep it closed. This will ensure that your kid can play safely inside the fenced area.

From: squidoo.com Opens in new window

Make the family tub safe

Bathtubs are incredibly slippery, so outfit yours with a rubber bath mat for more secure seating.

A cushioned spout cover can protect your toddler’s head from painful bumps. Also, be sure that any sliding glass shower doors are made from safety glass.

From: babycenter.com Opens in new window

Social media warning

Parents should start by educating themselves about social media.

Sign up for the services your children are on and read up about them. Find out what the dangers are and discuss them with your children.

From: sun-sentinel.com Opens in new window

Toddler injuries

The toddler years could be called the first-aid years. Your baby’s rapidly increasing mobility will give her many more chances to injure herself.

While you may have needed little more in the way of a first-aid kit than a thermometer, a medicine dropper, a bottle of acetaminophen drops, and syrup of ipecac during your baby’s first year, now’s the time to stock up on adhesive bandages, cotton balls, tweezers, and calamine lotion.

From: familyeducation.com Opens in new window

Car seat fact

Did you know 98% of car seats are installed incorrectly?

From: ezinearticles.com Opens in new window

Balloons at chld parties

Avoid having balloons at parties for kids under 3, because balloons can be a choking hazard.

From: associatedcontent.com Opens in new window

Watch out for small objects

Anything that’s small or sharp is dangerous, as kids love exploring with their mouths. Make sure that small and sharp objects are out of reach, so clear tables and counter tops.

From: itsamomsworld.com Opens in new window