Measuring your baby

It is crucial for the doctor’s measurements to be as accurate as possible because a discrepancy of as little as a few millimeters in length or a few grams in weight can make a difference where your baby falls on the charts.

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Washing hands is important

The single most important thing your child can do to prevent illness is to wash his or her hands thoroughly and frequently.

Despite your best efforts, your child is going to get sick, especially during his or her first few years of contact with larger groups of children. But a child’s immunity improves with time.

School-age children gradually become less prone to common illnesses and recover more quickly from the diseases they do catch.

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Vitamin D recommendations

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has doubled the amount of vitamin D it recommends for infants, children, and adolescents.

As recently as 2003, the AAP recommended 200 international units (IU) a day starting within the first two months of life.

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Allergies and hereditary

The tendency to develop allergies is often hereditary, which means it can be passed down through your genes.

However, just because you, your partner, or one of your children might have allergies doesn’t mean that all of your kids will definitely get them.

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Remembering what’s important

Many parents find it difficult to deal when your toddler is sick and also maintain regular household duties. Let the chores go for a time. Your house will be fine and the rest of your family will survive.

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Hot weather tip

In the hot weather kids drink a lot of liquids so make time for frequent bathroom breaks.

If your child is still in diapers, be sure to check them often to see if they are in need of a change. The last thing you want is your baby to end up with diaper rash.

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Avoiding the sun in the heat of the day

If you can, avoid sun exposure from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. This is when the sun’s rays are most intense. Keep in mind that even on cloudy days, the sun can be just as strong; you’ll want to use these same precautions on those days as well.

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Dust and allergies

Dust mites are one of the most common causes of allergies. These microscopic insects live all around us and feed on the millions of dead skin cells that fall off our bodies every day.

Dust mites are the main allergic component of house dust, which is made up of many particles and can contain things such as fabric fibers and bacteria, as well as microscopic animal allergens.

Dust mites are present year-round in most parts of the United States (although they don’t live at high altitudes), and live in bedding, upholstery, and carpets.

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Cold and sickness tip

If your toddler is sick with cold, try applying a balm or petroleum jelly around the nostrils to provide relief and reduce irritation.

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Soothing a stuffy nose

Saline nose drops or spray provides immediate relief for a stuffy nose. Both will moisten the membranes and loosen the secretions, making it easier for your child to either blow their nose on their own, or else help from a bulb syringe.

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Multivitamins

Don’t call multivitamins candy – this will have your toddler begging for more. (The multi’s cartoon-character shapes are tempting enough without being told they’re a treat.)

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Antibiotics and colds

Don’t be tempted to push your doctor for antibiotics to treat the cold.

Antibiotics won’t help (colds are caused by viruses, not bacteria) and the overuse of antibiotics is contributing to the growth of bacterium that are resistant to treatment.

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Why toddlers vomit and get diarrhea

Vomiting and diarrhea are common in toddlers because they tend to put everything (including fingers) in their mouths.

Offer her small amounts of clear fluid (water, oral dehydration fluid or flat lemonade diluted one-to-four with water if she won’t drink water alone) regularly until the problem passes. If you are worried that she is not getting better, ask your health care professional for advice.

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Immunization Schedule

Get a personalized immunization schedule with the Immunization Scheduler from BabyCenter.

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Allergy or cold?

Repeated or chronic cold-like symptoms that last more than a week or two, or develop at about the same time every year, including a runny nose, nasal stuffiness, sneezing, throat clearing, and itchy, watery eyes may be the signs of allergies

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Have a primary health provider

Make sure your child has a primary health provider.

Prevention is the key to a healthy childhood. So make sure that your child has a primary health provider, such as a pediatrician or family practitioner, who knows your child before your child has an illness, injury, or developmental delay that requires medical attention

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Soaps, shampoos, and dry skin

Soaps, shampoos, and bubble baths can dry your child’s skin and may cause rashes, so use them sparingly.

They may also be irritating to the urethra, which in turn might increase the risk of urinary tract infections. To avoid having your toddler sit too long in potentially irritating soap-filled water, have playtime at the beginning of the bath, and save the soap and shampoo for the end.

From: babycenter.com.

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Choose an appropriate flavor for medicines

If available, choose a favorite or fun flavor for your toddler’s medicine, such as cherry, grape, or bubble gum.

If appropriate, request the flavor when your doctor writes the prescription.

From 365 Toddler Tips.

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Toddler-to-Teen Immunization Schedule

Vaccines are an important part of every child’s health care regimen, and one of the best ways to keep your child healthy is to get those immunizations on time. This chart will help busy moms stay on schedule when it comes to the vaccines kids need at every age.

From: iVillage.com

Drinking milk

Getting Kids to Drink Milk: For children, who don’t care for milk, add a few drops of food coloring and serve with straws.
From: Moms on the Move.com