Allergens

Did you know that nearly 85 percent of allergy sufferers are allergic to dust mites. http://bit.ly/iTpUSD

Lactose intolerance

Lactose intolerance is a common example of food intolerance caused by lacking an enzyme needed to digest milk sugar.

When the child eats milk products, symptoms such as gas, bloating, abdominal pain and diarrhea can occur.

From: toddlerstoday.com

When to introduce new foods

Introduce new foods during the morning or early afternoon. This will enable you to deal with any adverse reactions when your pediatrician is in office.  Should an adverse reaction occur during the morning/early afternoon, it will cause the least amount of disruption in baby’s fragile routine.

From: wholesomebabyfood.com

Eight top allergens

Eight top allergens account for 90 percent of all food allergies.

These include Tree nuts (almonds, cashews, walnuts), Eggs, Milk, Peanuts, Shellfish (crab, lobster, shrimp), Wheat, Fish (bass, cod, flounder) and Soy

From: allergycases.org

Signs of allergy

In many children, an allergic reaction to a food causes chronic eczema. These dry, scaly patches of skin usually show up on the face, kneecaps, and elbows.

From: babycenter.com

The beginning of food allergies

By the time a toddler reaches school age, food allergies have usually presented themselves. However, it can be important to remember that allergic reactions to foods served in a school setting are possible.

According to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI), about 25 percent of reactions in school-age children occurred at school, either in cafeterias, playgrounds or classrooms.

From: toddlerstoday.com

Percentage of children with allergies

Although many parents suspect their child is allergic to certain foods, only about 6 percent of young children and 3 to 4 percent of adults in the United States have a food allergy.

From: babycenter.com

Food Allergies in young children

According to figures released by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in 2011, based on the agency’s National Health Interview Survey, 4.5 percent of children younger than 18 years of age have a food allergy.

From: babycenter.com Opens in new window

Antihistamines and allergies

Antihistamines are the gold standard of allergy treatment. They work by blocking the effect of histamine, the chemical released from certain cells in the body after being exposed to an allergen.

From: webmd.com Opens in new window

Foods in first year

There are certain foods that are not recommended for the first year of life, eggs, shellfish, fish, nuts, and peanuts are not recommended.

From: childfoodallergy.com Opens in new window

Allergies and night time

Studies show that allergy symptoms are worse at night between 4 a.m. and 6 a.m. Taking allergy medicine at night before bedtime may help reduce morning allergy symptoms such as sneezing and nasal congestion.

From: webmd.com Opens in new window

Allergies and school lunch

Educate the cafeteria staff. If your child will be purchasing school lunches, It’s recommended meeting with the cafeteria staff and providing them with a picture of your child. This will help them identify your child so they can steer them toward smart choices when buying their lunch.

From: allergykids.com Opens in new window

Getting allergy symptoms under control.

Review what you can do when you are having a hard time getting your child’s allergy symptoms under control.

From: about.com Opens in new window

Allergy symptoms

Worried that your toddler could be suffering from allergies or asthma? Coughing, wheezing, itching, or a runny nose could mean you’re right.

From: babycenter.com Opens in new window

Allergies and productivity

Children who suffer with allergy symptoms can have reduced productivity at school, poor sleep, and daytime drowsiness.

From: webmd.com Opens in new window

Play-Doh and allergies

Did you know that Play-Doh may cause allergy reactions for tots with wheat allergies?

From: kidswithfoodallergies.org Opens in new window

Are you allergic?

Did you know that nearly 85 percent of allergy sufferers are allergic to dust mites.

From: babycenter.com Opens in new window

Allergies in infants

The first sign of allergy usually in infants is eczema, which is a dry, itchy, scaly skin condition the hallmarks are really itching and dryness and redness of the skin.

From: childfoodallergy.com Opens in new window

Allergy symptoms

You can suspect allergies if your child has symptoms after being around a specific indoor allergy trigger. These allergy symptoms usually include a runny nose, stuffy nose, sneezing, and red eyes.

From: pediatrics.about.com Opens in new window

Seasonal allergies

Sometimes children will outgrow seasonal allergies, others may have allergies get worse as they get older.

Allergy shots can help kids who have severe allergies, and they may help prevent kids from developing asthma. It takes many years for these shots to be effective, and they can only begin once a child reaches the age of 4 or 5.

From: life123.com Opens in new window