Allergy symptoms

Worried that your toddler could be suffering from allergies or asthma? Coughing, wheezing, itching, or a runny nose could mean you’re right.

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Allergies and productivity

Children who suffer with allergy symptoms can have reduced productivity at school, poor sleep, and daytime drowsiness.

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Play-Doh and allergies

Did you know that Play-Doh may cause allergy reactions for tots with wheat allergies?

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Are you allergic?

Did you know that nearly 85 percent of allergy sufferers are allergic to dust mites.

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Allergies in infants

The first sign of allergy usually in infants is eczema, which is a dry, itchy, scaly skin condition the hallmarks are really itching and dryness and redness of the skin.

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Allergy symptoms

You can suspect allergies if your child has symptoms after being around a specific indoor allergy trigger. These allergy symptoms usually include a runny nose, stuffy nose, sneezing, and red eyes.

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Seasonal allergies

Sometimes children will outgrow seasonal allergies, others may have allergies get worse as they get older.

Allergy shots can help kids who have severe allergies, and they may help prevent kids from developing asthma. It takes many years for these shots to be effective, and they can only begin once a child reaches the age of 4 or 5.

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Allergies and hereditary

The tendency to develop allergies is often hereditary, which means it can be passed down through your genes.

However, just because you, your partner, or one of your children might have allergies doesn’t mean that all of your kids will definitely get them.

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Dust and allergies

Dust mites are one of the most common causes of allergies. These microscopic insects live all around us and feed on the millions of dead skin cells that fall off our bodies every day.

Dust mites are the main allergic component of house dust, which is made up of many particles and can contain things such as fabric fibers and bacteria, as well as microscopic animal allergens.

Dust mites are present year-round in most parts of the United States (although they don’t live at high altitudes), and live in bedding, upholstery, and carpets.

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Allergy contrbutors

Dust, cats, peanuts, cockroaches all contribute to allergies. Up to 50 million Americans, including millions of kids, have some type of allergy. In fact, allergies account for the loss of an estimated 2 million schooldays per year.

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Allergic causing foods and diet

Evidence suggests there’s actually no reason to wait to give your child allergy-causing foods (unless you know they are allergic) .

Until very recently it was common practice to delay giving dairy foods until 12 months, eggs until age two, and seafood and nuts till age three, the American Academy of Pediatrics changed its thinking in 2008, suggesting that these foods can be introduced to young children at the same time as other foods.

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Explaining food allergies

A food allergy is a reaction of the body’s immune system to something in a food or an ingredient in a food – usually a protein.

Common symptoms include skin irritations such as rashes, hives, and eczema, and gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea, diarrhea, and vomiting, sneezing, runny nose, and shortness of breath.

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Combatting allergy attacks

No matter how hard you try, it can be virtually impossible to control everything that goes into your toddler’s mouth.

That’s why it’s best to be prepared for when a child with allergies eats something they are allergic to by having children’s antihistamines (like Benadryl) on hand.

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Top allergens

The most common allergen foods – often called the "Big 8 – are peanuts, milk, eggs, soy, wheat, fish, crustacean shellfish, and tree nuts such as walnuts and almonds. These eight foods cause more than 90 percent of all food allergic reactions. Among children, allergy to milk and eggs are most common. 

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Millions with food allergies

If your child has a food allergy, they’re not alone. It’s estimated that up to 5 million children in the US have a food allergy.

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Dust mites

Dust mites congregate where moisture is retained and food for them (human skin scales) is plentiful.

They are especially numerous in bedding, upholstered furniture, and rugs. Padded furnishings such as mattresses, box springs, and pillows should be encased in allergen-proof, zip-up covers, which are available through catalogs and specialized retailers.

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High pollen-count days

Those with allergies might want to avoid going outdoors on high pollen-count days.

You can check the pollen count daily on the local weather and news reports, and on Web sites such as American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology. Peak time is early morning from 5 a.m. to 10 a.m.

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Identifying food allergies

Symptoms that occur repeatedly after eating a particular food that may include hives, swelling, gagging, coughing or wheezing, vomiting or significant abdominal pain may point to food allergies

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Allergy or cold?

Repeated or chronic cold-like symptoms that last more than a week or two, or develop at about the same time every year, including a runny nose, nasal stuffiness, sneezing, throat clearing, and itchy, watery eyes may be the signs of allergies

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Allergy Season

If your toddler is allergic to pollens, she will be more likely to have an allergic reaction during the spring, summer, and fall, but not as much in the winter

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