Planning the time for a party

When planning a party, time the party around naps so everyone’s freshest. Mid morning (10-11) or later afternoon (3-4) are good bets.

Quiet activities before meals

A quiet activity or a rest before meals or snacks is a good idea as a tired or energized toddler may well not be interested in eating.

When tantrums occur

Children are more likely to have tantrums when they are bored, tired, hungry, unwell or overwhelmed by events.

Preparing for playdates

Having a clean and child proofed home is important, especially when hosting a first ever play date. For first play dates, parents often want to attend or at least view your home.

Trick-or-treat safety tip

When going out trick-or-treating, fasten reflective tape to costumes and bags to help drivers see you.

The better halloween mask

Halloween masks are a chore, and it’s the first thing a tot will rip off when trick-or-treating, instead of masks, have your kids wear make-up so they can see better.

Planning a party for Halloween?

Partying on Halloween? Unless you plan to take your guests on their quest for candy, you should pick a night other than the 31st. 

Keeping together when trick-or-treating

If your kids are old enough to trick-or-treat without an adult, tell your kids to stay in a group.

Pumpkin danger

Keep clear of pumpkins that contain lighted candles. These are sometimes a magnet for curious children, who may try to touch, pick up, or peek inside them.

Healthy snacks are the key

For picky eaters between the ages of 1 and 3, healthy snacks at regular intervals are key. Toddlers have small appetites, so they won’t eat much at each meal.

Halloween party menus

When deigning a spooky menu for halloween, serve finger foods that come in Halloween colors, such as orange slices, Cheetos, baby carrots, cheddar cheese cubes, Ho-Hos, black licorice, and blackberries.

Removing items for trick-or-treaters

To keep homes safe for visiting trick-or-treaters, parents should remove from the porch and front yard anything a child could trip over such as garden hoses, toys, bikes and lawn decorations.

Lighting pumpkins

Consider using a flashlight or glow stick instead of a candle to light your pumpkin. If you do use a candle, a votive candle is safest.

Jump in the leaves!

Enlist the whole family to help with the yard work. Rake up the leaves into a giant pile and jump in.

Limiting TV time

As much as you treasure the quiet that comes with a Disney DVD, try to limit your child’s TV time to no more than two hours a day.

Organize your own learning experience

Visit farms, go camping or take the kids hiking. While toddlers may not be able to enjoy the outing as much as an older kid would, it can still be a great learning experience if you prepare the trip in advance.

Sugars in drinks

Many foods and drinks have sugar added to them. For a sweet treat, pick foods that are naturally sweet, such as strawberries, honey and pineapple, rather than cakes or biscuits.

Dust and allergies

Dust mites are one of the most common causes of allergies. These microscopic insects live all around us and feed on the millions of dead skin cells that fall off our bodies every day.

Encouraging make-believe

Stock your shelves with goodies like boxes of various shapes, dress up clothes, puppets and kitchen items, to encourage make-believe skills.

Think fresh!

Serve as much fresh food as possible. When our babies are small we tend to stew apples, pears and other fruit, but when they no longer need to have mushy food, transition to fresh fruits.