Traveling documents

Bring a birth certificate when traveling. Once child is 2, you have to pay for seat & the airline would be happy to charge Source

Never forget your snacks again

Pack all the food for tomorrow’s outing and put it in a large bag in the refrigerator.

Then put your car keys on top of the bag so there’s no way you can leave the house and forget the food.

From: Huggieshappybaby.com

Air travel

When traveling by air, you are allowed one carry-on item per ticketed passenger, plus a purse or diaper bag. If your baby has their own seat, you can take along an extra carry-on for them.

From: sarahsonging.hubpages.com Opens in new window

Air travel with a baby

Use a pacifier during take-off and landings. The sucking helps minimize pressure on the eardrums during take-off and landing.

From: knol.google.com Opens in new window

Renting cariers at the airport

Families who travel by air should consider buying or renting a CARES airplane child harness for their toddlers. Significantly less bulky than a car seat, the CARES (it stands for Child Aviation Restraint System) child harness is easy to pack and unpack from carry on luggage.

It weighs less than a pound and is really easy to use.

From: ciaobambino.com Opens in new window

Digital photo archive activity

Going on a trip? Fill up the iPhone or iPod with family photos and videos. Toddlers love going through the family digital photo archive.

From: babble.com Opens in new window

Car trip travel tip

When going on long car trips, prepare ahead with paper bags of items to be given out every 25, 50 or 75 miles — marked on a map with the location, it takes a little bit of preparation to do this but it REALLY helps young children.

In each bag put a wrapped item — usually a small toy. Then in some of the surprise packages you can add juice or a snack, stickers and a piece of paper, or something pertaining to the trip that you can talk about.

From: momsminivan.com Opens in new window

Visiting with the tots during the holidays

When you’re visiting friends and family during the holidays, try to minimize any disruption to your toddler’s schedule as much as possible.

If your toddler continues to eat and sleep at the same times as normal, he or she will be much better able to cope with holiday festivities.

From: christian-parent.com Opens in new window