Don’t force toddlers to share

Don’t force toddlers to share; it actually delays the development of sharing skills.

Kids need to feel secure in their ownership before they can share. Instead, introduce the concept of taking turns.

From parentingbookmark.com.

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Toddler gift tip

Looking for a good gift for your toddler?

Develop their musical skills with instruments like maracas, drums, xylophones and toddler tape players with big fat buttons for them to push.

From: families.com.

Presents that will help with development

Develop their small motor skills with toys like stacking toys, wooden puzzles with knobs, shape sorters and pop up toys with dials and knobs that their fingers can manipulate.

From: families.com.

Swapping out toys

Toddlers get bored of seeing the same old toys every morning. Stash a group of toys in a closet, attic, or basement so that every eight weeks or so, you can replace the been-there-done-that toys with some “new” toys, toys from your very own store.

From: Grasshopper New Media

Making bubbles at home

Make easy homemade bubbles, mix 1 cup of water and 1/2 cup of liquid dish soap and blow away.

From: LifeTips

Toy tip.

Plastic Rubbermaid bins with the sealing lid are very spacious and better than toy chests, and hampers because they have a top that closes tightly and goes over the bin, making it hard for the toddler to access the toys and preventing them from throwing toys all over the room.
From: AssociatedContent.com

Toys for the car only.

Pick out a few interesting toys and books just for the car: I found that I could defuse the tantrum that inevitably occurred when my toddler realized that he was about to be strapped into a car seat by strategically offering him a toy or book he didn’t get to see all that often.
From: GrasshopperNewMedia.com

Limiting toys

Place only a few toys out on the floor – it is best to limit the amount of toys that you let your toddler play with, make sure to keep other toys out of sight and out of reach to prevent your toddler from pulling them down and throwing them every place.

Giving your child a few toys to play with at a time, gets your toddler used to the concept of neatness, and when it is time to put the toys away, your toddler might be able to do it because of the small amount of toys.
From: AssociatedContent.com

Swapping out toys

Toddlers get bored of seeing the same old toys every morning. Stash a group of toys in a closet, attic, or basement so that every eight weeks or so, you can replace the been-there-done-that toys with some “new” toys, toys from your very own store.
From: GrasshopperNewMedia.com