Thumb sucking at bedtime

Thumb sucking is a perfectly acceptable way for your child to comfort himself, at bedtime or any other time – although it can lead to dental problems in older children.

Thumb sucking is a way for a toddler to soothe himself, not only when he’s sleepy but also at other times of the day.

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Foods can cause sleep problems

It is possible that something the baby eats could be contributing to sleep problems.

Some babies that are on formula have sensitivities to certain types of formula. For babies that have started solids, food allergies or sensitivities can impact sleep.

Also, certain types of foods consumed too close to bedtime can prevent good sleep.

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Practice consistency in bed time

Children need time to calm down and prepare for sleep.

Having a consistent bedtime routine can be useful in giving the child cues that sleep time is coming. There are likely things that you do each night before bed, such as putting on pajamas, brushing teeth, reading bedtime story, nursing or rocking, and so on.

Try to do those things in the same order to help your child understand what is coming next and learn to calm down through that process.

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Sleep sacks for babies

Sleep sacks have been popular with European parents for a long time because they minimize the risk of baby suffocating.

The ultimate solution for keeping babies safe and warm at night and during naptime, they provide a safe alternative to sheets, blankets, and comforters.

From: likemom.com Opens in new window

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Baby and baby blankets

Babies love the warmth and security of their own blanket. Choose one that is small enough that they can carry it around as a toddler.

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How to signal children it’s time to sleep

Kids often nap on small cots at daycare with their favorite blanket. It’s the arrival of the blankie that signals “nap” – not where they are.

Try to associate nap time with a portable object, rather than with a place.

From: ehow.com.

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Time to leave the crib

Once your child is able to climb out of his crib (and you have already lowered the mattress and removed the bumper pads), it is time to move him into a toddler bed.

If your child is three feet tall, you may want to move him to a toddler bed even if he isn’t climbing out of his crib yet.

From: pediatrics.about.com.

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Toddlers and nap time

At 18 months most toddlers take at least one naps (length of naps are usually very variable between different children, but naps are usually 1-1 1/2 hours long) during the day at this age and are able to sleep all night (for 11-12 hours).

From: pediatrics.about.com.

Pillow safety

A toddler pillow is a pillow that is just the right size for a child of two years or more.

Prior to age two, use of a pillow of any type is considered dangerous and is not recommended.

From articlecity.com.

Morning start up tip

Mornings can be tough for everyone with children.

Try taking five to ten minutes with your 2-year-old when he first wakes up to snuggle and talk quietly about the day, the whole morning will go much more smoothly.

From huggieshappybaby.com.

Mattress warnings

Use a safe crib with a snug fitting mattress that cannot get pulled away from the corners. You should not be able to fit more than two fingers between the edge of the mattress and the crib.

From: ParentingToddlers.com

Child beds

Involve your child in selection of her new bed. It’s best to allow her to choose new bedding with some of her favorite characters.
From: eZine Articles.com

Preschoolers and naps

Most preschoolers do still need naps during the day. They tend to be very active — running around, playing, going to school, and exploring their surroundings — so it’s a good idea to give them a special opportunity to slow down.
From: KidsHealth.org

Co-sleeping safety tip

When co-sleeping make sure your mattress fits snugly in the bed frame so that your baby won’t become trapped in between the frame and the mattress.
From: KidsHealth.org