Allergies and night time

Studies show that allergy symptoms are worse at night between 4 a.m. and 6 a.m. Taking allergy medicine at night before bedtime may help reduce morning allergy symptoms such as sneezing and nasal congestion.

From: webmd.com Opens in new window

Allergies and school lunch

Educate the cafeteria staff. If your child will be purchasing school lunches, It’s recommended meeting with the cafeteria staff and providing them with a picture of your child. This will help them identify your child so they can steer them toward smart choices when buying their lunch.

From: allergykids.com Opens in new window

Playdates and pets

When hosting playdates, as a courtesy, tell your guests ahead of time if you have any pets. Moms and kids may not be able to attend because they have allergies, and it’s best for them to know before they show up and start sneezing.

From: stayathomemoms.about.com Opens in new window

Getting allergy symptoms under control.

Review what you can do when you are having a hard time getting your child’s allergy symptoms under control.

From: about.com Opens in new window

Kids and parents with allergies

If one parent has allergies, your child has a 25 percent chance of having them. If both parents have allergies, then your child’s odds are at least 50 percent.

From: whattoexpect.com Opens in new window

Allergy symptoms

Worried that your toddler could be suffering from allergies or asthma? Coughing, wheezing, itching, or a runny nose could mean you’re right.

From: babycenter.com Opens in new window

Allergies and productivity

Children who suffer with allergy symptoms can have reduced productivity at school, poor sleep, and daytime drowsiness.

From: webmd.com Opens in new window

Play-Doh and allergies

Did you know that Play-Doh may cause allergy reactions for tots with wheat allergies?

From: kidswithfoodallergies.org Opens in new window

Are you allergic?

Did you know that nearly 85 percent of allergy sufferers are allergic to dust mites.

From: babycenter.com Opens in new window

Allergies in infants

The first sign of allergy usually in infants is eczema, which is a dry, itchy, scaly skin condition the hallmarks are really itching and dryness and redness of the skin.

From: childfoodallergy.com Opens in new window

Allergy symptoms

You can suspect allergies if your child has symptoms after being around a specific indoor allergy trigger. These allergy symptoms usually include a runny nose, stuffy nose, sneezing, and red eyes.

From: pediatrics.about.com Opens in new window