Toddler food alergies explained

A toddler food allergy is when our immune system wrongly interprets as harmful something we have eaten, and reacts to it.

From: parents-in-a-pickle.com.

How to tell the difference between allergies and colds

Does your baby have allergies or is it just a nasty cold? One easy way to tell is to simply wait a few days. If the runny nose, congestion, and watery eyes seem to improve or go away then he more than likely has a cold. However, if the symptoms persist despite everything then nasal allergies may be to blame.

From: Thelaboroflove.com.

Testing for allergies

If you suspect your child has a true food allergy, then have her seen by a physician so testing can be arranged. Food allergies can be life threatening and therefore, must be taken seriously.

From: theparentreport.com.

Informing children about food allergies

Once your child has been tested and the food allergy is confirmed, then it’s vital that he or she is well informed of what food he or she is allergic to and that this food is avoided without exception

From: theparentreport.com.

Common Allergies

If you or your spouse suffer from allergies (especially food allergies) or your other kids are allergic you should definitely avoid the most common food allergy foods, such as nuts, shell fish and eggs.

From: childfoodallergy.com.

Allergies run in the family

If a parent or sibling is allergic to a food, your child may be more likely to develop an allergy.

However, you may increase the chances of preventing a food allergy if you eliminate the offending food from your toddler’s diet.

From: wyethnutrition.com

Allergy Prevention

Battle down the allergens. Use a dehumidifier to keep humidity levels below 50 percent, especially in the basement where mold spores and bacteria tend to thrive.
From: Mommy Tips.com

Introducing new foods

Introduce one new food at a time. Add another new food after four or five days. Waiting allows the baby to get used to new flavors and allows you to identify any problem foods easily if allergic reactions occur.
From: HelpGuide.org

Light is good

Expose your baby to about 30 minutes of light each morning. Why? Light suppresses the release of the sleep hormone melatonin; this helps set her internal clock — making it easier for her to fall asleep at night.
From: Parents.com