Give fair warning.

Many parents swear by a warning system to get tots to move from place to place, try a 5 or 10 minute countdown.

Let him succeed and fail

Just as you encourage him to triumph, let him learn to fail, too, and then be there for him with hugs and encouragement.

Making routine things special

Making little, things routine (ie:singing a song@bedtime or pancakes on the weekends) turns them into special traditions.

Actively Listen

Actively listen to your children to find out what’s causing their behavior and help them through difficult moments.

Praising 4×1

Remember to praise & encourage child for appropriate behavior. Rule of thumb is to give 4 positive comments for 1 reprimand.

Empathizing

Empathizing, instead of minimizing feelings, helps recover more quickly from disappointment & teaches to regulate emotions.

Keep eye contact

Eye contact tells child she is important & that you are focusing on her. It also encourages her to make eye contact with you.

Red Flag Moments

Save ‘No’ for ‘red flag’ moments when safety/health at risk, give immediate response when tot crosses the line. http://bit.ly/PjI7YA

Limiting playdate interaction

Interacting with just one other child is a big deal for a toddler – inviting more than that may make it impossible for them all to have a good time.
From: All Good Articles.com

Household chores make kids happier

Get your kids involved in household duties at an early age.

Research suggests that kids who are involved in household chores from an early age tend to be happier and more successful.

From: academyforcoachingparents.com

Being non-judgemental

Practice and hone your skills at being non-judgmental.

Start labeling feelings and avoid name-calling. Say, "he seems angry," rather than, "what a jerk." When your kids are whiny or crying, saying things like, "you seem sad," will always be better than just asking them to stop.

Depriving kids of the feelings they’re experiencing will only drive them underground and make them stronger.

From: academyforcoachingparents.com

Develop balance and strength

A great way to teach your toddler to walk is to tiptoe. Tiptoe teaches your toddler to actually use his/ her own body weight to develop strength and balance.

Before allowing the child to tiptoe, make sure you do it while the child is watching. Then have the child follow you as you tiptoe forward, backward, sideward and in circles.

From: iloveindia.com

No and yes

Change from using "no" comments to using "yes" comments as much as possible. For example, you can change "No food throwing!" to "Food stays on our highchair tray." This helps to identify the rules without starting an emotional battle.

From: howkidsdevelop.com Opens in new window

Walking toddlers

Between their newly found independence, and their newly acquired skill of walking, toddlers can be hard to manage indoors. Save yourself the headache of saying ‘no’ all the time and lock up (or put out of reach) your valuables.

From: kidspot.com Opens in new window

Rules

Rather than overloading your child with rules from the outset – which may frustrate him or her – prioritize those geared toward safety first and then gradually add rules to your list over time.

From: mayoclinic.com Opens in new window

Cut down on the warnings

If the child knows the rules, impose the promised consequences immediately. If you make a habit of giving six preliminary warnings your child will learn to start responding only the eighth or ninth time you ask.

From: parentingbookmark.com Opens in new window

Importance of facial expressions

Remember the importance of facial expressions and touch. Simply rubbing a child’s back, smiling and winking, or tucking a child into bed communicates, "I care about you."

From: howkidsdevelop.com Opens in new window

Positive attention

Positive attention tops the list of parenting tips for toddlers. Make sure your displays of affection for your child outnumber any consequences or punishments.

From: mayoclinic.com Opens in new window

Consistency

Consistency is key in using time-out as an effective strategy for discipline.

Pick a time-out space, whether it be a mat, a chair or a room. Let your children know that certain actions, such as hitting, will result in time out.

From: lifetips.com Opens in new window

TV and kids

The American Academy of Pediatrics suggests keeping kids’ screen time to no more than two hours per day.

From: whattoexpect.com Opens in new window